Motor Vehicle Crashes in Belgrade 2/26/16

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Belgrade, Mont.- On Friday, February 2016, Belgrade Police Officers responded to five separate motor vehicle crashes and we have received many inquiries as a result.  Two of these were reported injury crashes:

At approximately  1901 hours, the Belgrade Police Department, Central Valley Fire District and American Medical Response were dispatched to  a crash involving a pickup truck versus bicyclist, which occurred on Jackrabbit Lane near the intersection of Madison Avenue.  The bicyclist was treated for apparent minor injury.

At approximately 1950 hours, the Belgrade Police Department, Central Valley Fire District and American Medical Response were dispatched to a high-speed, head-on collision involving a passenger car and pickup truck, just west of Jackrabbit Lane on Frontage Road.  Both drivers sustained serious injuries and patient extrication lasted upwards of one hour.  Both drivers were transported to the hospital for treatment.

Both incidents remain under investigation.  As with any incident, witnesses are urged to contact the Belgrade Police Department at 388-4262 with any information.

 

Trees Win Again

img_0248-6.jpeg(Big Sky, Mont.)

This morning at 10:24 the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office received a call from the Big Sky Snowmobile Trail Groomer reporting that a snowmobiler had struck a tree in the Sage Creek area, 10 miles from the Taylor Fork parking lot.

 The victim, a 37 year old male from Phoenix, AZ was with four other snowmobilers vacationing in the area. The victim was described as displaying signs of a concussion and pain in one of his wrists. An off duty deputy recreating in the area located the victim and was able to provide the Sheriff’s Office with exact GPS coordinates. Members of Sheriff’s search and rescue at  Big Sky, Big Sky Fire and Summit Air ambulance responded to the incident.  Rescuers were able to temporarily treat the victim’s injuries. The long distances and rough terrain can make back country rescues a long and painful process for the victims. Weather and snow conditions in the area allowed rescuers to locate a suitable landing zone near the incident. This allowed Summit Air to reach the victim and transport him to Bozeman Deaconess Hospital for further medical treatment.    

 The snowmobile party did not have survival/first aid equipment with them and the incident could have been much more serious if had not been for the groomer being in the area and rapid response of rescue units.

 Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin would like to remind snowmobilers to be careful and know their limitations, the limitations of their snowmobiles and the changing snow conditions. Be alert for hazards such as trees, hidden stumps and rocks which can be unpredictable and unforgiving. Also remember to have first aid and survival equipment (food, GPS, charged cell phone, fire starters, etc.) with you when ever you travel into the back country.

  

Slippery Rescue on the M

img_0248-6.jpeg(Bozeman, Mont.) On February 21,  at 12:58 p.m., the Gallatin County dispatch center received a 9-1-1 call reporting a 51-year- old female from Goffstown, New Hampshire had fallen on the “M” trail and injured her lower leg. The individual had been hiking to the “M” with her teenage sons while on a college visit to Montana State University. The hiker slipped on a patch of ice, twisting her leg and falling on the trail approximately 500-700 years from the base of the “M” while on the way back to the parking area.

Rescuers from American Medical Response, Bridger Canyon Fire, and Sheriff’s Search and Rescue responded. Rescuers hiked to the individual, stabilized the leg, and assisted with pain management. Search and Rescue Posse members followed with a special one-wheeled litter. She was secured on the litter and brought down the mountain to the ambulance. American Medical Response transported her to Bozeman Deaconess Hospital, where she was diagnosed with a fractured ankle.  
Rescuers encountered slick and muddy conditions, including slush and ice, during the rescue. The one-wheeled litter and ropes for braking were utilized in the rescue, as well as plenty of manpower. A local retired ski patroller with Search and Rescue and medical experience came upon the injured hiker, called for emergency services and waited with the hiker and her sons until the rescue was complete
Photos courtesy of the Sheriff’s office. 

   
   

img_0248-6.jpeg(West Yellowstone, Mont.) On February 20, 2016 at 1:38 p.m., the West Yellowstone Police Department dispatch center received a call from the Fremont County Sheriff’s Office requesting assistance with a backcountry rescue.  A 25 year Nevada man rolled his snowmobile and suffered head and facial injuries. The accident occurred on the BPA Powerline trail off of the Two Top snowmobile trail system.  

Rescuers from the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office, Hebgen Basin Fire District, and the West Yellowstone Division of the Sheriff’s Search and Rescue responded. Responders were able to locate the accident scene, but no injured snowmobilers. While on scene the Search and Rescue incident command was able to make phone contact with the original reporting party who informed the team that they were able to bandage their buddy up and ride him out to the town of West Yellowstone where they were going to transport him to the Big Sky Medical Center by automobile.
Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin would like to remind snowmobilers to know their limitations and the limitations of their snowmobiles and stay on marked trails. The off trail areas are unmaintained and can be full of unseen hazards. Be alert for hazards such as tree wells or hidden stumps as which can beunpredictable and unforgiving. It is also important to stay on scene until rescue personnel arrive. If you do decide to leave the scene, please call 911 and let them know so that emergency responders can cancel their response; making them more readily available for other rescues that may arise.

Trees Always Win

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(West Yellowstone, Mont.) 

On February 19, 2016 at 10:18 a.m., the West Yellowstone Police Department dispatch center received a 911 call reporting a 68 year old male snowmobiler from Jacksonville Florida who had collided with a tree and suffered a broken leg. The individual had been snowmobiling with four of his friends off trail on the Two Top snowmobile trail system about five miles west of the Town of West Yellowstone. The snowmobiler lost control of his two-up trail snowmobile and crashed into a tree.

 Rescuers from the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office and the West Yellowstone Division of the Sheriff’s Search and Rescue responded. Responders were able to locate the individual and determined that he had broken his femur and kneecap. Due to horribly bumping trail conditions, a medical helicopter was dispatched. A Life Flight Network helicopter out of Rexburg, Idaho arrived on scene approximately thirty minutes later and made a backcountry landing approximately ¼ of mile from the patient. Search and Rescue personnel were able to load the patient onto a rescue sled and transport him to the awaiting helicopter where he was loaded and flown to the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  

Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin would like to remind snowmobilers to know their limitations and the limitations of their snowmobiles, and stay on marked trails. The off trail areas are unmaintained and can be full of unseen hazards. Be alert for hazards such as tree wells or hidden stumps as which can be unpredictable and unforgiving. Always let another member of your group know if you venture off trail keeping in mind that the most dangerous situations can occur if you get injured when you are alone. Photo courtesy of the Sheriff’s office

  

Washington Snowmobiler Dies in Crash near West Yellowstone

img_0248-6.jpeg(West Yellowstone, Mont.)
On February 15, 2016 at 10:15 a.m., the West Yellowstone Police Department dispatch center received a 911 call reporting a 53 year old male snowmobiler had collided with a tree. He was traveling with a group of five other snowmobilers. The male was in and out of consciousness at the time of the initial call. Approximately 15 minutes later dispatch received an additional 911 call indicating that the male had stopped breathing and the group had begun CPR.

 Personnel from the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office, US Forest Service, and the West Yellowstone Division of the Sheriff’s Search and Rescue responded to the GPS coordinates collected from the two calls to dispatch. The incident was near the old ski hill in the Lionshead area, approximately 10 miles west of West Yellowstone. Responders were able to locate the injured snowmobiler and immediately took over CPR. After performing CPR for well over 30 minutes, rescue efforts were halted and the individual was pronounced deceased by an on-scene Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Coroner.

 The male snowmobiler was identified as Edward Collins Eldridge of Duvall, Washington.  

 Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin extends his condolences to Mr. Eldridge’s family and friends. When recreating in the backcountry, it is important to remember to travel with friends and to have a reliable means of emergency communication. In this case, the snowmobiler was traveling with friends and they were able to reach 911 immediately. 

 The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office coroner is investigating the crash. 

Update. He was wearing a helmet and his party did have emergency and rescue gear. 

Valentine Snowmobiles

img_0248-6.jpeg

(West Yellowstone, Mont.) On February 14, 2016 at 4:49 p.m., the West Yellowstone Police Department Dispatch received a call from a snowmobiler reporting that she had become separated from her boyfriend and thought he may be lost. The snowmobiler reported that her boyfriend was on Lionshead somewhere. Shortly thereafter, Fremont County dispatch in Idaho received a 911 call from the lost snowmobiler, a 25 year old from Billings Montana, reporting that his snowmobile was stuck and he had no idea where he was.

Personnel from the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office, and the West Yellowstone Division of Sheriff’s Search and Rescue responded.

The GPS coordinates retrieved from the man’s 911 call were incorrect indicating that the snowmobiler was on Sawtell Mountain in Idaho. Fremont County Search and Rescue was notified and had a rescue team enroute. Meanwhile a Team from Gallatin County Search and Rescue proceeded to the location given to Deputies by the snowmobiler’s girlfriend. As the rescue team proceeded into the area to begin their search, they located the lost snowmobiler and were able to extract his snowmobile and escort him safely back to West Yellowstone. The snowmobiler was exhausted from hours of digging but otherwise in good health.

Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin would like to remind snowmobilers to stay with their group and have a pre-arranged rendezvous location picked out should anyone become separated. An emergency pack including an avalanche beacon, poles, shovel and emergency supplies are a must when venturing into the backcountry. A simple mistake can quickly turn dangerous if you are unprepared.

Separated Snowmobiler Helped

img_0248-6.jpegOn February 14, at about 2:00 P.M, a juvenile  Snowmobiler called in stating he was stuck, was separated from his riding buddy and was not sure of his exact location. Using the GPS coordinates off his cell phone call, a Sheriff’s Search and Rescue member from Big Sky located him off the Buck Ridge Trail and with some help was able to get the snowmobile back on the main trail so the male could ride out to the main highway.
 Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin would like to remind snowmobilers to know their limitations and stay on marked trails. The off trail areas are unmaintained and can be full of unseen hazards. Be alert for hazards such as tree wells or hidden stumps as which can be unpredictable and unforgiving. Always let another member of your group know if you venture off trail keeping in mind that the most dangerous situations can occur if you get injured when you are alone.

 

Sheriff’s Office offers CIT Academy

CRISIS INTERVENTION

TEAM ACADEMY #10

Hosted by:

Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office

February 8-12, 2016

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Location:

Bobcat Stadium

1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman MT 59717

This CIT academy is based on the Memphis model. Its purpose is to assist first responders (law enforcement officers), detention staff, and dispatchers in engaging, assessing, and assisting individuals in crisis with mental and/or co-occurring substance disorders.  CIT is a 40-hour evidence based training that encompasses tools and skills needed for first responders, detention staff, and dispatchers to better manage individuals presenting with mental health and/or co-occurring substance disorders.  This training exposes the participants to materials and experiences from trained mental health and medical professionals to better prepare them to effectively and safely work with this unique population.

This training is for all law enforcement officers, Detention Officers, and Dispatchers in the State of Montana.

After successful completion of this forty-hour course, the law enforcement officer will be certified by Montana DPHHS Addictive & Mental Disorders Division and Montana P.O.S.T. as a CIT Officer

CIT Academy instruction includes:

Suicide assessment and intervention                                               Elderly and children’s issues

Substance abuse and dual diagnosis                                                Developmental disabilities

Introduction to mental illness                                                            Intervention strategies

Psychotropic medications                                                                  Scenario training

Legal Issues                                                                                           Site visits

 

Tuition:                  $100.00 per student

 

For registration or further information, contact:

Jim Anderson

Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office

Crisis Intervention Team coordinator

Jim.anderson@gallatin.mt.gov

Office (406) 582-2102 fax (406) 582-2026

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

LIMITED SPACE IS AVAILABLE 

Friday, February 12 is scenario day, if you’d like to observe these, please contact Jim Anderson at the above email or office number.