7/6/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: July 6, 2020

As of Monday, July 6, 2020, at 12 p.m. Gallatin County has had 32 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 since Friday, July 3, for a cumulative total of 326.

There were 16 new cases reported on Saturday, 11 new cases reported on Sunday and five new cases reported on Monday. One case that was previously assigned to Gallatin County was reassigned to another county.

See the full press release here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

7/3/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: July 3, 2020

As of Friday, July 3, 2020, at 12 p.m. Gallatin County has seven new confirmed cases of COVID-19, for a cumulative total of 295. There are 45 confirmed active cases and no hospitalizations. There have been a total of 249 people recovered in Gallatin County. One person has died from COVID-19 complications.

See the full press release here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

7/2/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: July 2, 2020

As of Thursday, July 2, 2020, at 11 a.m. Gallatin County has four new confirmed cases of COVID-19, for a cumulative total of 288. There are 46 confirmed active cases and one current hospitalization. There have been a total of 241 people recovered in Gallatin County. One person has died from COVID-19 complications.

See the full press release here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

7/1/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: July 1, 2020

As of Wednesday, July 1, 2020, at 11 a.m. Gallatin County has 11 new confirmed cases of COVID-19, for a cumulative total of 284. One case previously assigned to Gallatin County has been reassigned to another county.

There are 49 confirmed active cases and one current hospitalization. There have been a total of 234 people recovered in Gallatin County. One person has died from COVID-19 complications.

See the full press release here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

 

6/30/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: June 30, 2020

As of Tuesday, June 30, 2020, at 12 p.m. Gallatin County has 11 new confirmed cases of COVID-19, for a cumulative total of 274. There are 44 confirmed active cases and one current hospitalization. There have been a total of 229 people recovered in Gallatin County. One person has died from COVID-19 complications.

Three cases that were previously assigned to Gallatin County have been reassigned to other counties.

See the full press release here.

Matt Kelley, Health Officer for the Gallatin City-County Health Department, will be holding a virtual press conference on Wednesday, July 1 at 3 p.m. Mountain Time. Matt will be giving a general update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County and answering press questions.

Call-in information is below:

+1 406-247-0860

Conference ID: 473 905 324#

The press conference will also be streamed live on the GCCHD Facebook page.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

 

July 4th Holiday Patrols

 

 

June 30, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Plan for a Sober Ride: Increased Patrols Watching for Impaired Driving Over Fourth of July
Law enforcement out in full force for the holiday in Gallatin County

Gallatin County, June 30, 2020 –Fourth of July and the celebration of our country’s independence brings many things to mind – family, friends, food, and fireworks. But all too often, alcohol and driving are added to the mix with tragic results. Law enforcement is increasing patrols on the roads in all areas of Gallatin County, along with the Montana Highway Patrol statewide, around the Fourth of July holiday to remind motorists to drive sober or get pulled over.

Summer is the deadliest time of year for motor vehicle crashes, over the last decade 48% of all fatal crashes and 45% of all serious injury crashes in Montana occurred between June and September – the period of time known nationally as the “100 Deadliest Days.” Historically, the 100 Deadliest Days in Montana has represented 50% of the annual roadway fatalities involving an impaired driver. (2010-2019).

“There is no excuse for driving while impaired. It’s every driver’s responsibility to be sober and take traffic safety seriously – for themselves, their friends and family, and everyone else on the road.”

As law enforcement leaders we encourage everyone to make a responsible plan before the Fourth of July celebrations begin; whether that means having a designated driver, calling a cab, ordering a ride share or offering a sober ride to others if you’re not drinking.

It is illegal to drive in Montana with a BAC (blood alcohol content) of .08 or higher, and the consequences include a DUI charge, having your driver’s license revoked, mandatory classes, possible jail time, and up to $10,000 in fines and legal fees. Unfortunately, in the event of an impaired driving crash, the cost can be serious injury or even death.

This Fourth of July celebrate your freedom by making the right choice. If you choose to drink, plan for a safe, sober ride. Do your part to help Montana reach Vision Zero – zero deaths and zero serious injuries on our roads – by always driving sober, buckling up and calling 911 to report suspected impaired driving.

Sheriff Brian Gootkin – Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office
Chief Dennis Hengel – Manhattan Police Department
Chief Steve Crawford – Bozeman Police Department
Chief E. J. Clark Jr. – Belgrade Police Department
Chief Bill Dove – Bozeman/Yellowstone Airport Police Department
Chief Kevin Gillilan – Montana State University Police Department
Capt. Mark Wilfore – Montana Highway Patrol District 7 Commander

This is a Vision Zero Message from the Montana Department of Transportation. This and other enforcement and educational campaigns are strategies to reach Vision Zero — zero deaths and zero serious injuries on Montana roadways. For more information about Vision Zero, contact Janet Kenny, Montana Department of Transportation, (406) 444- 7417, jakenny@mt.gov

Alternative accessible formats of this document will be provided on request. Persons who need an alternative format should contact the Office of Civil Rights,
Department of Transportation, 2701 Prospect Avenue, PO Box 201001, Helena, MT 59620. Telephone 406-444-5416 or Montana Relay Service at 711.

West Gallatin Raft Rescue

(Gallatin County, Mont) On June 27, 2020, at 3:40 pm, Gallatin County 911 received a report of a middle-aged couple who were rafting on the Gallatin River when their boat flipped over; the caller could no longer see them. Members from Gallatin County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue and first responders were able to quickly locate the couple and get them to safety. The woman was transported to the hospital with minor injuries. The couple had been rafting on the Gallatin River and were just north of Gateway South Rd when they drifted under an overhanging tree branch which caught the side of the raft and flipped it. The couple floated underneath the overturned craft for 100 yards down river until they were able to grab onto a log.

Photo courtesy of Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office

6/29/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County


For immediate release: June 29, 2020

As of Monday, June 29, 2020, at 12 p.m. Gallatin County has 12 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 since Sunday. Between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning, there were 18 new cases, for a cumulative total of 266. There are 43 confirmed active cases and one current hospitalization. There have been a total of 222 people recovered in Gallatin County. One person has died from COVID-19 complications.

The new cases are located across Gallatin County, and are a mix of contacts to known cases, community spread and travel related.

See full press release here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

 

Search and Rescue 2019 Annual Report

(Gallatin County, Mont) Last year, Gallatin County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue went on 108 calls, of which 42 were searches and 62 were rescues. It included 16 mutual-aid calls. One hundred and fifty-two volunteers dropped what they were doing to go help someone 1367 times and spent over 10,000 hours on calls and training. For more information on what happened in 2019, see our 2019 Annual Report.

https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/6b8f4894f0254b74865ef2411f47a85d.

Photo courtesy of Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office

6/26/2020 Update on COVID-19 in Gallatin County

 

 

 

 

 

For immediate release: June 26, 2020

The Gallatin City-County Health Department on Friday announced six additional COVID-19 cases in individuals from many areas of Gallatin County and urged residents and visitors to avoid settings such as parties, large gatherings, or crowded bars and restaurants where social distancing may be difficult.

As of 5 pm on June 25, 38 individuals in Gallatin County had tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 over the past seven days, for a cumulative total of 236 cases in Gallatin County during 2020. There were 32 confirmed active cases as of 5 pm on Thursday. Of those cases, none are hospitalized.  (One person hospitalized earlier this week was discharged from the hospital.)

The cases reported this week live and work in many areas of Gallatin County. The Health Department this week has identified 10 cases in Big Sky, two cases in West Yellowstone, and several cases in the Gallatin Valley. (The West Yellowstone cases were reported after 5 pm on Thursday and will be reflected in the daily report total on Saturday.) The Health Department is also working with Montana State University to respond to five COVID-19 cases affiliated with the university. In all cases the Health Department is working with those who have been diagnosed, relevant local authorities and doing extensive contact tracing and testing to identify others who may have the disease.

“We are now seeing widespread community transmission similar to what we saw in late March and early April,” said Matt Kelley, Health Officer with Gallatin City-County Health Department. “And we are seeing significant numbers of cases in people who have been in crowded bars, parties, and other events.”

One way to measure cases in a community is through a rolling 7-day average of new cases.  In Gallatin County the rolling seven-day average has increased by 50% over the past 14 days, from 3.6 cases per day two weeks ago to 5.4 cases on Friday. (A graphic showing the rolling seven day average is included in Figure A below.)

Kelley said the steadily increasing case numbers is concerning in light of rapid and expansive growth of outbreaks in other parts of the nation, including Texas, California, Florida, Arizona, and Oklahoma.  Other states experiencing rising numbers of cases include Montana, Utah, Idaho, and Washington.

“This is serious and we need people to take it seriously,” said Kelley. “That means people should avoid crowded settings, wear face coverings where social distancing is difficult, and stay home when they are sick, even with mild symptoms.”

Especially concerning, Kelley said, is that a significant number of cases in Gallatin County are experiencing mild symptoms or no symptoms at all. That increases the possibility that the disease may be spreading among people who do not know or believe they are sick. This sort of disease spread can be more extensive and can lead to more serious illness in others, Kelley said.

Kelley reinforced the importance for all Montanans to take precautions and limit contact with others in order to protect themselves and to protect people with health conditions that make them especially vulnerable to the disease.  He urged young people to be aware that their presence in crowded parties, bars and other settings can accelerate disease spread and could cause them to carry the virus to those who are most vulnerable.  Kelley said being within six feet of others for 15 minutes or more increases the risk to spread and contract the disease.

“This is not just about you,” Kelley said. “This is about protecting your loved ones and your community.”

In light of the rise in cases, Kelley said Gallatin City-County Health Department will be taking a cautious and measured approach to efforts to allow visitors in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that serve seniors. Gov.  Steve Bullock announced this week that the state would move to allow more visitation of people in long-term care settings.  Kelley urged families and care centers to take a cautious and patient approach, and reminded all that the Gallatin City-County Board of Health local emergency health rule continues to restrict visitation in order to protect seniors.

“We agree on the need to find ways to allow seniors to see their loved ones, and we are determined to make that happen in the safest possible way,” Kelley said.  “Over the next 10 to 14 days, we will be working with facility managers, families, and the Board of Health to develop new guidelines that allow visitation in a way that protects seniors.”

Kelley noted that a high percentage of deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. have happened in long-term care settings, where the disease can spread rapidly and where residents are especially vulnerable.

Kelley noted that the rise in cases has been accompanied by a detected presence of the virus in wastewater samples gathering in Big Sky and Bozeman. Sewage samples gathered in Three Forks have not detected the virus to date, and samples gathered in West Yellowstone were still pending Friday afternoon. Click here to learn more about how it works and access data: https://www.healthygallatin.org/coronavirus-covid-19/wastewater-data/

To view this press release as a PDF click here.

The Gallatin City-County Health Department Call Center is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer questions about COVID-19. Reach the Call Center by phone at 406-548-0123 or email at callcenter@readygallatin.com.

The most accurate local source of information remains the GCCHD website.

 Figure A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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